Browse Items (47 total)

The definition of adolescents and young adults (AYAs) in oncology varies with upper limits up to age 39. Younger AYAs, ages 12-24 years, are often cared for within pediatrics. In caring for AYAs with cancer, there are unique considerations that…

Background: Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer receive high-intensity care and experience significant symptoms at the end of life. As novel cancer-directed therapies increase, AYAs with advanced cancer may face multiple treatment…

INTRODUCTION: Regret about loss is one of the most intense types of regret experienced in life. Little is known about the bereavement regret of parents whose child has died of cancer. Although knowledge about parents' experiences after their child's…

Background: Pediatric patients with sarcomas experience significant morbidity and compromised quality of life throughout their course. These times could be viewed as opportunities for increased subspecialty palliative care (PC). Systematically…

Backgrounds: Many adult patients with cancer who knowthey are dying choose less intense care. High intensity careis associated with worse caregiver outcomes. Little is knownabout intensity of treatment of end-of-life care in children withcancer in…

Background/objectives: Ethical challenges in pediatric oncology arise at every stage of illness. However, there are sparse data on the content of and reason for ethics consultations in the field. We sought to evaluate the content and characteristics…

Background: Empirical descriptions of a 'good death' exist for older adults with cancer, and these have served as the foundation for providing quality end of life care. In contrast, little is known about what, if anything, constitutes a 'good death'…

Children with cancer and their families experience shifts in spiritual wellness from diagnosis through treatment and survivorship or bereavement. An interdisciplinary team conducted a systematic review of quantitative and qualitative research on…

Background: Community hospitals represent a unique setting to provide pediatric palliative care (PPC), given their usual proximity to a patient's home. Texas Children's Hospital, TheWoodlands (TCH-TW) is a community-based campus that opened in April…

Objectives: Palliative radiation therapy (pRT) is often used to improve quality of life for pediatric patients. Though palliative doses are generally lower than those for cure, pRT may still introduce undesirable effects. The decision to pursue…

Background: Pediatric patients with cancer have many opportunities for increased primary or specialty palliative care (PC). This is particularly true for patients with solid tumors who often have higher symptom burden and worse outcomes. However, how…

Pediatric phase I clinical oncology trials represent a unique cohort of patients who have not responded to standard therapies and remain highly vulnerable to treatment toxicity and/or disease burden. Incorporating a palliative care consultation into…

Background: There is growing evidence that palliative care (PC) is associated with increased quality of life in children with cancer. Despite increasing recommendations in support of PC to improve pediatric oncology care, little is known about its…

Little is known about the experience of parents receiving results of quality-of-life research in pediatric advanced cancer. The PediQUEST study participants who indicated interest in results during enrollment were mailed summarized findings and the…

Background: Transitioning care for pediatric, adolescent,and young adult (AYA) patients with end-stage cancer tohome hospice care has been challenging in Japan due to the lack of local home-care clinics for daily care and local hospitals for urgent…

Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the availability and utilization of palliative care units among children with cancer in Japan. Methods: We conducted a nationwide cross-sectional survey of 368 palliative care units. We sent a…

Background/Objectives: Despite the dramatically improved outcomes for pediatric cancer patients, cancer is the leading cause of death in Taiwan, accounting for 21.8% of death in 2014. The pediatric end-of-life (EOF) care has not been extensively…

Background/Objectives: The purpose of the current study was to describe the lived experience of parents with a child with incurable cancer at the end of life (EOL). Design/Methods: A qualitative study was conducted following a phenomenological…

Background/Objectives: Discussing end-of-life (EoL) care is very challenging for adolescents and young adults (AYA) living with cancer. While many helpful documents exist to facilitate EoL conversations with adults, few resources exist to aid AYA in…

Background/Objectives: Bereaved parents during palliative care affects the quality of life of children and family. This research aims to explore parents' experiences caring children with cancer in palliative condition. Design/Methods: The research…

Background/Objectives: Palliative care for Pediatric cancer patients and their families includes the relief of symptom and improvement of quality of life at any and all stages of disease. There care are most effectively provided by an…

Background/Objectives: Although Pediatric palliative care (PPC) has developed worldwide with the increasing number of children with serious illness, the concept of Pediatric palliative care is still unfamiliar in Asia. We report on Pediatric cancer…

Background/Objectives: Palliative and supportive care needs of children with cancer and their families are unique and require special attention. Development of appropriate services sensitive to the needs of families and based on observed evidence has…

PURPOSE: We report on an in-depth interview and participant observation study that uses data from multiple sources to determine how the involvement of teenagers with leukaemia is understood and enacted in healthcare. In this article, we investigate…

Objectives: The goal of this study was to assess pediatric oncology providers' perceptions of palliative care in order to validate previously identified barriers and facilitators to early integration of a pediatric palliative care team (PCT) in the…

Background/Objectives: To address a service gap at the primary treating Center arising from patient overload and on holidays/weekends, Cankids Pediatric Palliative Care Center in Delhi was providing children with cancer inpatient admissions and…

Background/Objectives: To clarify the availability and utilization of specialist palliative care services among children with life-threatening conditions in Japan. Design/Methods: A questionnaire was administered to assess the availability of…

Background/Objectives: As cancer care has improved, so has the understanding that children with cancer are at risk for psychological distress. The American Academy of Pediatrics has highlighted the importance of addressing these concerns. Our study…

Background/Objectives: Families often prefer home care to hospital care, and home-care services for ill children are increasing worldwide with limited knowledge of families' needs during curative and palliative home care. The aim of this study was to…

Background: There are 600 new pediatric cancer cases in Chile in a year, with an overall survival of 70% and there are two systems that guarantee the access for patients to health providers: The public system, or national health fund (FONASA), and…

Background: The care of pediatric patients with cancer and their families is complex and evolving. Despite significant advances in outcomes, symptoms of disease and complications of therapy continue to cause pain and other symptoms that could be…
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