At the End of Life: Pediatric Palliative Care Can Make a Difference in Caring for the Child and Family

Title

At the End of Life: Pediatric Palliative Care Can Make a Difference in Caring for the Child and Family

Creator

Cuervo M; Garcia X; Molina K; Claros A; Bolanos J; Alvarez T; Cleves D

Identifier

Publisher

Pediatric Blood and Cancer

Date

2022

Subject

agitation; anxiety; cancer patient; care behavior; child; conference abstract; controlled study; demography; dyspnea; fear; female; hospital mortality; human; intensive care unit; irritability; leukemia; major clinical study; male; middle income country; pain; palliative therapy; pediatric patient; quasi experimental study; retrospective study; school child; seizure; skill; social needs; terminal care; ward

Description

Background and Aims: WHO defines pediatric palliative care as the active total care of the child's body, mind and spirit, which also involves giving support to the family, the aim of this study is to describe the endof-life care of children with cancer during the end-of-life period who receive general palliative care or pediatric palliative care in low- and middle-income countries. Method(s): We conducted a retrospective quasi-experimental study between January 2013 and December 2020 with deceased pediatric cancer patients. Demographic and clinical variables were collected to describe end-of-life care received before (2013-2017) by general palliative care team and after (2018-2020) the creation of a pediatric palliative care team Results: A total of 180 pediatric patients were evaluated at the end of life (100 between 2013-2017 and 80 between 2018-2020). The median age was 11 years, regardless of sex. Half of the patients had a diagnosis of leukemia (49.8%), 52.7% receive palliative treatment for their oncological condition. Regarding symptoms, 72 hours before death, pain treatment was documented for 52.2% of the patients. Other signs and symptoms, such as dyspnea, seizures, agitation, and irritability, were present, with no differences between groups; however, it was noted that during PPC interventions, there was a significant reduction in anxiety or fear of end of life, we observed a greater number of interventions by the psychosocial professionals and also there was an increase in the number of patients who died in the hospital ward and a decrease in the number of patients who died in the intensive care unit. Conclusion(s): Pediatric palliative care requires special knowledge and skills, the provision of PPC for children with cancer allows patients and their families to receive support that alleviates the physical, emotional and social needs that arise from a life-limiting illness and finally receive high-quality end-of-life care.

Rights

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Citation List Month

December List 2022

Collection

Citation

Cuervo M; Garcia X; Molina K; Claros A; Bolanos J; Alvarez T; Cleves D, “At the End of Life: Pediatric Palliative Care Can Make a Difference in Caring for the Child and Family,” Pediatric Palliative Care Library, accessed May 27, 2024, https://pedpalascnetlibrary.omeka.net/items/show/18531.