A Longitudinal, Randomized, Controlled Trial Of Advance Care Planning For Teens With Cancer: Anxiety, Depression, Quality Of Life, Advance Directives, Spirituality

Title

A Longitudinal, Randomized, Controlled Trial Of Advance Care Planning For Teens With Cancer: Anxiety, Depression, Quality Of Life, Advance Directives, Spirituality

Creator

M.E. Lyon; Wang J

Identifier

DOI: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2013.10.206

Publisher

Journal Of Adolescent Health

Date

2014

Subject

Adolescent; Adult; Advance Care Planning/statistics & Numerical Data; Advance Directives/psychology; Advance Directives/statistics & Numerical Data; Anxiety/complications; Anxiety/psychology; Depression/complications; Depression/psychology; Family; Feasibility Studies; Female; Follow-up Studies; Humans; Longitudinal Studies; Male; Neoplasms/complications; Neoplasms/psychology; Patient Satisfaction/statistics & Numerical Data; Quality Of Life/psychology; Spirituality; Surveys And Questionnaires; United States; Young Adult
Adolescent; Advance Care Planning; Advance Directive; African-american; Cancer; Communication; Decision-making; End Of Life; Family Intervention; Pediatric Palliative Care

Description

To test the feasibility, acceptability and safety of a pediatric advance care planning intervention, Family-Centered Advance Care Planning for Teens With Cancer (FACE-TC).
METHODS:
Adolescent (age 14-20 years)/family dyads (N = 30) with a cancer diagnosis participated in a two-armed, randomized, controlled trial. Exclusion criteria included severe depression and impaired mental status. Acceptability was measured by the Satisfaction Questionnaire. General Estimating Equations models assessed the impact of FACE-TC on 3-month post-intervention outcomes as measured by the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory 4.0 Generic Core Scale, the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory 4.0 Cancer-Specific Module, the Beck Depression and Anxiety Inventories, the Spiritual Well-Being Scale of the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-IV, and advance directive completion.
RESULTS:
Acceptability was demonstrated with enrollment of 72% of eligible families, 100% attendance at all three sessions, 93% retention at 3-month post-intervention, and 100% data completion. Intervention families rated FACE-TC worthwhile (100%), whereas adolescents' ratings increased over time (65%-82%). Adolescents' anxiety decreased significantly from baseline to 3 months post-intervention in both groups (β = -5.6; p = .0212). Low depressive symptom scores and high quality of life scores were maintained by adolescents in both groups. Advance directives were located easily in medical records (100% of FACE-TC adolescents vs. no controls). Oncologists received electronic copies. Total Spirituality scores (β = 8.1; p = .0296) were significantly higher among FACE-TC adolescents versus controls. The FACE-TC adolescents endorsed the best time to bring up end-of-life decisions: 19% before being sick, 19% at diagnosis, none when first ill or hospitalized, 25% when dying, and 38% for all of the above.
CONCLUSIONS:
Family-Centered Advance Care Planning for Teens With Cancer demonstrated feasibility and acceptability. Courageous adolescents willingly participated in highly structured, in-depth pediatric advance care planning conversations safely.

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. PedPalASCNET does not hold any rights over the resource listed here. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Citation List Month

July 2016 List

Citation

M.E. Lyon; Wang J, “A Longitudinal, Randomized, Controlled Trial Of Advance Care Planning For Teens With Cancer: Anxiety, Depression, Quality Of Life, Advance Directives, Spirituality,” Pediatric Palliative Care Library, accessed September 21, 2021, https://pedpalascnetlibrary.omeka.net/items/show/10925.

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