Melatonin ineffective in neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis patients with fragmented or normal motor activity rhythms recorded by wrist actigraphy

Title

Melatonin ineffective in neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis patients with fragmented or normal motor activity rhythms recorded by wrist actigraphy

Creator

Hätönen T; Kirveskari E; Heiskala H; Sainio K; Laakso M L; Santavuori P

Publisher

Molecular Genetics and Metabolism

Date

1999

Subject

Adolescent; Adult; Antioxidants/tu [Therapeutic Use]; Child; Circadian Rhythm; Dose-Response Relationship; Drug Electrophysiology; Female; Humans; Male; Melatonin/tu [Therapeutic Use]; Neuronal Ceroid-Lipofuscinoses/dt [Drug Therapy]; Sleep Wake Disorders/th [Therapy]; 0 (Antioxidants); JL5DK93RCL (Melatonin); sleep disturbance/disorders; NCL3; pharmacologic intervention; melatonin

Description

Melatonin was tested as a sleeping pill in five patients with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses. The single-blind, placebo-controlled study consisted of motor activity recordings, sleep logs, and administration of placebo or melatonin (2.5 or 5 mg). Daily motor activity rhythms were measured by wrist actigraphy during four 7-day periods (baseline, placebo, melatonin 2.5 mg, and melatonin 5 mg). The placebo or melatonin was administered in the evenings for 3 weeks, and the recordings were made during the last week of the 3-week treatment. Sleep logs were kept by the caregivers during the recordings. Based on period analyses, the activity recordings were evaluated to display a normal (24-h) or fragmented rhythm. Three patients had normal motor activity patterns during the baseline recordings, and administration of placebo or melatonin did not affect their rest/activity rhythms. Two patients had abnormally fragmented activity rhythms during the baseline periods, and administration of placebo or melatonin did not induce synchronization. According to the actigraphic data, there were no changes in activity rhythms resulting from administration of melatonin. However, based on the observations, three families reported that melatonin slightly improved the sleep quality of the patients. These controversial findings show the difficulties involved in specifying the role of melatonin in modulating sleep. Thus, we conclude that more evidence is required before the significance of melatonin as a sleeping pill is defined.Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

Rights

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Citation

Hätönen T; Kirveskari E; Heiskala H; Sainio K; Laakso M L; Santavuori P, “Melatonin ineffective in neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis patients with fragmented or normal motor activity rhythms recorded by wrist actigraphy,” Pediatric Palliative Care Library, accessed January 18, 2022, https://pedpalascnetlibrary.omeka.net/items/show/16678.

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