Exploring spirituality, religion and life philosophy among parents of children receiving palliative care: a qualitative study

Title

Exploring spirituality, religion and life philosophy among parents of children receiving palliative care: a qualitative study

Creator

Miquel P; Clemente I; Ciccorossi M

Publisher

BMC Palliative Care

Date

2024

Subject

child; Palliative Care; adult; article; female; human; male; palliative therapy; aged; coping; knowledge; Spain; personal experience; terminal disease; parent; qualitative research; health care personnel; decision making; interview; pediatric hospital; clinician; religion; philosophy; religiosity; Southern European

Description

Background: Few studies have examined the spiritual environment of parents of children receiving palliative care in Southern European countries, which are mostly characterized by secularization (or the abandonment of traditional religiosity) and an increase of cultural and religious diversities resulting in a much broader spectrum of spiritual and religious beliefs. This study aimed to explore the parents' own spirituality, religiosity, and philosophy of life in coping with the care of their child with palliative needs. Methods: Qualitative interviews of 14 parents of children included in a palliative care program in a pediatric hospital in Barcelona, Spain. Inclusion criteria were parents of children who have been cared for the palliative care program for a minimum of 3 months and who displayed a willingness to talk about their personal experiences and gave written consent. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed by an independent service, and analyzed on a case-by-case basis using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. Results: The three domains identified were life philosophy, relational, and transcendent. Life philosophy included principles that guided parents' decision-making, and how the onset of their child's serious illness had promoted a change in their values. Relational was focused on how they perceived themselves (e.g. motherhood), others (e.g. one's own child exceptionality), and the way they believed others perceived and supported them (e.g. relatives, friends, and healthcare providers). The transcendent domain involved God-related concepts, divinity and divine intervention (e.g. a miracle as an interpretive framework for that which cannot be explained within scientific knowledge limitations). Conclusions: Inflexible categories identifying parents as having a particular religious faith tradition are not sufficient to capture the interrelation of knowledges (ethical, religious, scientific) that each parent generates when faced with their child receiving palliative care. Clinicians should explore parents' spirituality in an individualized way that responds to the uniqueness of their experiential process.

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. PedPalASCNET does not hold any rights over the resource listed here. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Citation List Month

April List 2024

Collection

Citation

Miquel P; Clemente I; Ciccorossi M, “Exploring spirituality, religion and life philosophy among parents of children receiving palliative care: a qualitative study,” Pediatric Palliative Care Library, accessed May 22, 2024, https://pedpalascnetlibrary.omeka.net/items/show/19551.