Dying and Death in a Pediatric Cardiac ICU: Mixed Methods Evaluation of Multidisciplinary Staff Responses

Title

Dying and Death in a Pediatric Cardiac ICU: Mixed Methods Evaluation of Multidisciplinary Staff Responses

Creator

Broden EG; Bailey VK; Beke DM; Snaman JM; Moynihan KM

Publisher

Pediatric Critical Care Medicine

Date

2023

Subject

child; article; controlled study; human; major clinical study; terminal care; education; attention; content analysis; physician; multidisciplinary team; nurse; in-hospital mortality; coronary care unit

Description

OBJECTIVES: Understanding factors influencing quality of pediatric end-of-life (EOL) care is necessary to identify interventions to improve family and staff experiences. We characterized pediatric cardiac ICU (PCICU) staff free-text survey responses to contextualize patterns in quality of dying and death (QODD) scoring. DESIGN: This mixed methods study reports on a cross-sectional survey of PCICU staff involved in patient deaths. SETTING: Single, quaternary PCICU from 2019-2021. PARTICIPANTS: Multidisciplinary staff (bedside nurses, allied health professionals, and medical practitioners) rated QODD and voluntarily added free-text responses. We derived descriptive categories of free-text responses using content analysis. Response sentiment was classified as positive, negative or both positive and negative. We compared category and sentiment frequency by discipline, EOL medical intensity, years of experience and QODD score quartiles.None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Of 60 deaths and 713 completed staff surveys, 269 (38%) contained free-text responses, including 103 of 269 (38%) from nurses. Of six qualitative categories (i.e., relational dynamics, clinical circumstances, family experiences, emotional expressions, temporal conditions, and structural/situational factors), relational dynamics was most frequent (173 responses). When compared by discipline, family experiences were more common in nursing responses than medical practitioners or allied health. High intensity was associated with infrequent discussion of family experience and greater focus on temporal conditions and clinical circumstances. Emotional expressions and temporal conditions were more common in lowest QODD quartile surveys. Although 45% staff responses contained both sentiments, relational dynamics and family experiences were more likely positive. Negative sentiments were more common in the lowest QODD quartile surveys and responses containing temporal conditions or structural/situational factors. CONCLUSION(S): Synergistic relationships between the multidisciplinary team and family shaped clinician's positive responses. Attention to team dynamics may be a crucial ingredient in interventions to improve EOL care. Our data support that team-based education initiatives should consider differential foci between disciplines and EOL characteristics.Copyright © 2023 by the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies.

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. PedPalASCNET does not hold any rights over the resource listed here. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Citation List Month

November List 2023

Collection

Citation

Broden EG; Bailey VK; Beke DM; Snaman JM; Moynihan KM, “Dying and Death in a Pediatric Cardiac ICU: Mixed Methods Evaluation of Multidisciplinary Staff Responses,” Pediatric Palliative Care Library, accessed May 19, 2024, https://pedpalascnetlibrary.omeka.net/items/show/19364.