Care Provider Behaviors That Shape Parent Identity as a "Good Parent" to Their Seriously Ill Child

Title

Care Provider Behaviors That Shape Parent Identity as a "Good Parent" to Their Seriously Ill Child

Creator

Neumann ML; Weaver MS; Lord B; Wiener L; Hinds PS

Publisher

Palliative Medicine Reports

Date

2021

Subject

child; United States; article; female; hospital admission; human; male; priority journal; quality of life; palliative therapy; hospice; Europe; parent; interpersonal communication; legal guardian; patient comfort; physician; child parent relation; demographics; care behavior; health belief; voice; nurse; medical decision making; encouragement; reassurance

Description

Full text linksCite Abstract Background: Parents of medically complex children hold deeply personal definitions of how to be "good parents" that guide their medical decision making and interactions with providers and are impacted by provider behaviors. Objective: This study explored whether and how these beliefs are shaped by interactions with care providers and which provider behaviors foster or impede parents' ability to achieve their "good parent" definitions. Methods: A 63-item web-based survey distributed by an online support network for parents of medically complex children. Responses to closed- and open-ended questions from 67 caregivers based in the United States and Europe were analyzed. Results: Respondents' medical decisions are driven by goals of unselfishly doing what is best for my child (61%) and being my child's voice (18%). Almost half indicated that their personal "good parent" definition was impacted by provider behaviors or interactions with physicians or nurses. Although most parents reported wanting trusted care providers to ask them about their personal "good parent" definition, only 7% had ever been directly asked by members of their care teams about this topic. Provider behaviors such as kind and caring interactions, acknowledging the parents' role in caring for the child, and truly seeing the child as more than a diagnosis were reported as fostering caregivers' ability to achieve their "good parent" beliefs. Conclusions: The findings indicate that trusted provider-initiated conversations about "good parent" beliefs would be well received and are an opportunity to improve family-centered care. Care provider behaviors deemed by parents as supportive facilitate their efforts to achieve their "good parent" beliefs.

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. PedPalASCNET does not hold any rights over the resource listed here. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Citation List Month

August List 2023

Collection

Citation

Neumann ML; Weaver MS; Lord B; Wiener L; Hinds PS, “Care Provider Behaviors That Shape Parent Identity as a "Good Parent" to Their Seriously Ill Child,” Pediatric Palliative Care Library, accessed May 25, 2024, https://pedpalascnetlibrary.omeka.net/items/show/19230.