Can the Ethical Best Practice of Shared Decision-Making lead to Moral Distress?

Title

Can the Ethical Best Practice of Shared Decision-Making lead to Moral Distress?

Creator

Prentice TM; Gillam L

Publisher

Journal of bioethical inquiry

Date

2018

Subject

Neonatology; Humans; Burnout Professional; Attitude of Health Personnel; Patient Participation; Morals; Stress Psychological; Decision-making; Decision Making/ethics; Clinical ethics; End-of-life issues; Patient Care/ethics; Physicians/ethics/psychology; Professional-professional relationship

Description

When healthcare professionals feel constrained from acting in a patient's best interests, moral distress ensues. The resulting negative sequelae of burnout, poor retention rates, and ultimately poor patient care are well recognized across healthcare providers. Yet an appreciation of how particular disciplines, including physicians, come to be "constrained" in their actions is still lacking. This paper will examine how the application of shared decision-making may contribute to the experience of moral distress for physicians and why such distress may go under-recognized. Appreciation of these dynamics may assist in cross-discipline sensitivity, enabling more constructive dialogue and collaboration.

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. PedPalASCNET does not hold any rights over the resource listed here. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Citation List Month

April 2019 List

Collection

Citation

Prentice TM; Gillam L, “Can the Ethical Best Practice of Shared Decision-Making lead to Moral Distress?,” Pediatric Palliative Care Library, accessed November 16, 2019, https://pedpalascnetlibrary.omeka.net/items/show/16129.

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