Achieving Child-Centred Care for Children and Young People with Life-Limiting and Life-Threatening Conditions-A Qualitative Interview Study

Title

Achieving Child-Centred Care for Children and Young People with Life-Limiting and Life-Threatening Conditions-A Qualitative Interview Study

Creator

Coombes L; Braybrook D; Roach A; Scott H; Harðardóttir D; Bristowe K; Ellis-Smith C; Bluebond-Langner M; Fraser LK; Downing J; Farsides B; Murtagh FEM; Harding R

Publisher

European Journal of Pediatrics

Date

2022

Subject

Family/Psychology; Parents/Psychology; Adolescent; Child; Child Care; Children; End of Life Care; Humans; Normality; Paediatrics; Palliative Care; Qualitative Research; Social Support; Symptom Assessment

Description

This study aims to identify the symptoms, concerns, and care priorities of children with life-limiting conditions and their families. A semi-structured qualitative interview study was conducted, seeking perspectives from multiple stakeholders on symptoms, other concerns, and care priorities of children and young people with life limiting and life-threatening conditions and their families. Participants were recruited from six hospitals and three children's hospices in the UK. Verbatim transcripts were analysed using framework analysis. A total of 106 participants were recruited: 26 children (5-17 years), 40 parents (of children 0-17 years), 13 siblings (5-17 years), 15 health and social care professionals, 12 commissioners. Participants described many inter-related symptoms, concerns, and care priorities impacting on all aspects of life. Burdensome symptoms included pain and seizures. Participants spoke of the emotional and social impacts of living with life-limiting conditions, such as being able to see friends, and accessing education and psychological support. Spiritual/existential concerns included the meaning of illness and planning for an uncertain future. Data revealed an overarching theme of pursuing 'normality', described as children's desire to undertake usual childhood activities. Parents need support with practical aspects of care to help realise this desire for normality. CONCLUSION: Children with life-limiting conditions and their families experience a wide range of inter-related symptoms, concerns, and care priorities. A holistic, child-centred approach to care is needed, allowing focus on pursuit of normal childhood activities. Improvements in accessibility, co-ordination, and availability of health services are required to achieve this. WHAT IS KNOWN: • Existing evidence regarding symptoms, concerns, and care priorities for children with life-limiting conditions is largely limited to proxy-reported data and those with a cancer diagnosis. • Child-centred care provision must be directed by children's perspectives on their priorities for care. WHAT IS NEW: • Social and educational activities are more important to children with life-limiting conditions than their medical concerns. • A holistic approach to care is required that extends beyond addressing medical needs, in order to support children with life-limiting conditions to focus on pursuit of normal childhood activities.

Rights

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Citation List Month

November 2022 List

Collection

Citation

Coombes L; Braybrook D; Roach A; Scott H; Harðardóttir D; Bristowe K; Ellis-Smith C; Bluebond-Langner M; Fraser LK; Downing J; Farsides B; Murtagh FEM; Harding R, “Achieving Child-Centred Care for Children and Young People with Life-Limiting and Life-Threatening Conditions-A Qualitative Interview Study,” Pediatric Palliative Care Library, accessed May 26, 2024, https://pedpalascnetlibrary.omeka.net/items/show/18555.