Childhood cancer physical symptom burden and parent distress: The role of parent rumination

Title

Childhood cancer physical symptom burden and parent distress: The role of parent rumination

Creator

Fisher RS; Perez MN; Basile NL; Pepper M; Gamwell KL; McNall-Knapp R; Carrick Carter J; Mayes S; Chaney JM; Mullins LL

Identifier

Publisher

Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology

Date

2021

Subject

Pain; Family; Pediatrics; Symptoms; Neoplasms; Distress; Parental Role; Caregiver Burden; Income Level; Rumination (Cognitive Process)

Description

Objective: Symptom burden of children with cancer appears to contribute to parent distress, but the mechanisms of this relationship are relatively unexplored. The current cross-sectional study examined rumination (i.e., repeated focus on negative events and experiences) as a mediator of the associations between parent-report of child (a) pain or (b) nausea, and parent posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS); parent-report of child symptoms → parent rumination → parent PTSS. Methods: Caregivers (N = 40, MAge = 38.7 years, female = 87.5%, White = 67.5%) of children with cancer (MAge = 9.4 years) were recruited at a Midwest pediatric cancer center following their child’s diagnosis (MMonths = 2.97 ± 1.98). Parents completed the PedsQL-Cancer Module, the Ruminative Response Scale, and the Impact of Events Scale—Revised. To test the hypothesized indirect effects, 2 separate regression models specifying 5,000 bias-corrected bootstrapping resamples were conducted via Hayes’ PROCESS macro. Family income served as a covariate. Results: Bootstrap regression analysis revealed that parent-report of child pain had an indirect effect on parent PTSS via parent rumination, controlling for family income, R2 = .37, ß = −.24, 95% CI [−.494, −.033]. Child nausea demonstrated an indirect effect on parent PTSS via parent rumination, controlling for family income, R2 = .36, ß = −.22, 95% CI [−.428, −.008]. Conclusions: Findings indicate that worse parent perception of child symptoms may lead to elevated parent distress through increased rumination. These results support the role of pediatric psychologists and the interdisciplinary team in alleviating parent distress through clinical management of both child physical symptoms and parent rumination. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)

Rights

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Citation List Month

Special Edition #1 2022 List

Citation

Fisher RS; Perez MN; Basile NL; Pepper M; Gamwell KL; McNall-Knapp R; Carrick Carter J; Mayes S; Chaney JM; Mullins LL, “Childhood cancer physical symptom burden and parent distress: The role of parent rumination,” Pediatric Palliative Care Library, accessed May 23, 2024, https://pedpalascnetlibrary.omeka.net/items/show/17873.