When a child dies the world should stop spinning: an autoethnography exploring the impact of family loss on occupation

Title

When a child dies the world should stop spinning: an autoethnography exploring the impact of family loss on occupation

Creator

Hoppes S

Publisher

American Journal Of Occupational Therapy

Date

2005

Subject

Adaptation; PedPal Lit; Cultural Attitude to Death Autobiography Family/psychologyGrief Humans Life Change Events Occupational Therapy/psychologyOccupations; Psychological Anthropology

Description

The death of a loved one disrupts family-members' occupational lives. This paper explores the role and course of occupation during a time when my nephew died. A qualitative research methodology, autoethnography, is used to develop the narrative. I found that familiar occupations lost meaning during this time and even seemed absurd. Paradoxically, occupation helped forge a vital pathway back to health and reconstruction of meaning. Four stages of occupation during a family crisis are proposed: maintenance, dissolution, ambivalence, and restoration and adaptation. Reflections on occupational therapists' role during family crises are discussed, as are implications for further research.
2005

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. PedPalASCNET does not hold any rights over the resource listed here. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Type

Journal Article

Citation List Month

Backlog

Citation

Hoppes S, “When a child dies the world should stop spinning: an autoethnography exploring the impact of family loss on occupation,” Pediatric Palliative Care Library, accessed March 3, 2024, https://pedpalascnetlibrary.omeka.net/items/show/13258.