Pediatric Palliative Care at Home: A Prospective Study on Subcutaneous Drug Administration

Title

Pediatric Palliative Care at Home: A Prospective Study on Subcutaneous Drug Administration

Creator

García-López I; Chocarro-González L; Martín-Romero I; Vázquez-Sánchez JM; Avilés-Martínez M; Martino-Alba R

Publisher

Journal of Pain and Symptom Management

Date

2023

Subject

drug administration; Home Care Services; home care services hospital-based; Palliative Care; Pediatrics; Prospective Studies; subcutaneous infusions; supportive care; symptom management

Description

CONTEXT: The subcutaneous route is a useful alternative for drug administration in palliative care. Although there is scientific evidence on its use in adult patients, the literature in pediatric palliative care is almost nonexistent. OBJECTIVES: To describe the experience of a pediatric palliative care unit (PPCU) with in-home subcutaneous drug administration symptom control. METHODS: Prospective observational study of patients receiving home-based subcutaneous treatment administered as part of a PPCU treatment regimen over 16 months. Analysis includes demographic and clinical variables and treatment received. RESULTS: Fifty-four different subcutaneous lines were inserted in the 15 patients included, mainly in the thigh (85.2%). The median time of needle in situ was 5.5 days (range: 1-36 days). A single drug was administered in 55.7% of treatments. The most frequently used drugs were morphine chloride (82%) and midazolam (55.7%). Continuous subcutaneous infusion was the predominant administration route (96.7%), with infusion rates oscillating between 0.1 mL/h and 1.5 mL/h. A statistically significant relationship was found between the maximum infusion rate and induration onset. Of the 54 lines placed, 29 (53.7%) had an associated complication requiring line removal. The primary cause for removal was insertion-site induration (46.3%). Subcutaneous lines were mainly used to manage pain, dyspnea, and epileptic seizures. CONCLUSION: In the pediatric palliative care patients studied, the subcutaneous route is most frequently used for administering morphine and midazolam in continuous infusion. The main complication was induration, especially with longer dwell times or higher infusion rates. However, further studies are required to optimize management and prevent complications.

Rights

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Citation List Month

July List 2023

Collection

Citation

García-López I; Chocarro-González L; Martín-Romero I; Vázquez-Sánchez JM; Avilés-Martínez M; Martino-Alba R, “Pediatric Palliative Care at Home: A Prospective Study on Subcutaneous Drug Administration,” Pediatric Palliative Care Library, accessed May 27, 2024, https://pedpalascnetlibrary.omeka.net/items/show/19124.