Death of a Child Prior to Midlife, Dementia Risk, and Racial Disparities

Title

Death of a Child Prior to Midlife, Dementia Risk, and Racial Disparities

Creator

Umberson D; Donnelly R; Xu M; Farina M; Garcia M A

Publisher

Journals of Gerontology. Series B, Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences

Date

2019

Subject

bereavement; cumulative advantage/disadvantage; Dementia; minority aging (race/ethnicity)

Description

OBJECTIVES: This study considers whether experiencing the death of a child prior to midlife (by parental age 40) is associated with subsequent dementia risk, and how such losses, which are more common for black than for white parents, may add to racial disparities in dementia risk. METHOD: We use discrete-time event history models to predict dementia incidence among 9,276 non-Hispanic white and 2,182 non-Hispanic black respondents from the Health and Retirement Study, 2000-2014. RESULTS: Losing a child prior to midlife is associated with increased risk for later dementia, and adds to disparities in dementia risk associated with race. The death of a child is associated with a number of biosocial variables that contribute to subsequent dementia risk, helping to explain how the death of child may increase risk over time.

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. PedPalASCNET does not hold any rights over the resource listed here. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Citation List Month

January 2020 List

Collection

Citation

Umberson D; Donnelly R; Xu M; Farina M; Garcia M A, “Death of a Child Prior to Midlife, Dementia Risk, and Racial Disparities,” Pediatric Palliative Care Library, accessed October 5, 2022, https://pedpalascnetlibrary.omeka.net/items/show/16880.

Social Bookmarking