Terminal nutrition: framing the debate for the withdrawal of nutritional support in terminally ill patients

Title

Terminal nutrition: framing the debate for the withdrawal of nutritional support in terminally ill patients

Creator

Winter SM

Publisher

The American Journal Of Medicine

Date

2000

Subject

Humans; United States; Medical Futility; Ethics; Medical; Death and Euthanasia; Enteral Nutrition/adverse effects; Fasting/physiology/psychology; Parenteral Nutrition/adverse effects; Terminal Care/methods/standards

Description

Nutrition and hydration have long been considered to be life-sustaining therapies that are associated with comfort and relief of suffering. This belief is largely based on our own experiences with the sensations of thirst and hunger, which have led physicians to question whether withdrawing or withholding nutritional support from a dying patient can be morally or ethically justified. When considered in light of the available evidence, the underlying premise of this question must be reevaluated. The evidence suggests an alternative formulation, namely, that unrequested nutritional support provided by either the enteral or parenteral route to a terminally ill patient may be both medically and ethically indefensible because it may increase suffering without improving outcome.
2000

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. PedPalASCNET does not hold any rights over the resource listed here. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Type

Journal Article

Citation List Month

Backlog

Pages

723-726

Issue

9

Volume

109

Citation

Winter SM, “Terminal nutrition: framing the debate for the withdrawal of nutritional support in terminally ill patients,” Pediatric Palliative Care Library, accessed January 19, 2022, https://pedpalascnetlibrary.omeka.net/items/show/12270.

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