Perceptions of neonatal palliative care: Similarities and differences between medical and nursing staff in a level IV neonatal intensive care unit

Title

Perceptions of neonatal palliative care: Similarities and differences between medical and nursing staff in a level IV neonatal intensive care unit

Creator

Kyc S J; Bruno C J; Shabanova V; Montgomery A M

Publisher

Journal of Palliative Medicine

Date

2020

Subject

attitudes toward palliative care; barriers to palliative care; facilitators of palliative care; neonatal intensive care unit; neonatal palliative care; NICU; perceptions

Description

Background: A significant number of newborns are affected by life-limiting or life-threatening conditions. Despite this prevalence, there are inconsistencies in attitudes toward, and delivery of, neonatal palliative care. Implementing neonatal palliative care practice requires a multidisciplinary, collaborative effort. Objective(s): To examine institutional and individual barriers to and facilitators of neonatal palliative care from both medical and nursing perspectives. Design/Setting/Subjects: A prospective cross-sectional study design was used to collect data using the Neonatal Palliative Care Attitude Scale (NiPCAS) survey from medical providers and nurses in a 64-bed level IV neonatal intensive care unit in the United States. The response rate was 67%. Measurements: The NiPCAS survey included 26 attitudinal questions on a Likert scale. The instrument included three subscales: organization, resources, and clinician, in addition to other questions. Result(s): Six facilitators to neonatal palliative care were identified: (1) support of palliative care by the health care team, (2) support of palliative care by medical and nursing practice, (3) agreement that palliative care is as important as curative care, (4) parental involvement in decision making, (5) recognition of the importance of palliative care education, and (6) prioritizing pain relief. Three barriers to neonatal palliative care were highlighted: (1) a physical environment that is not conducive to providing palliative care, (2) technological obligations and parental demands, and (3) the societal belief that babies should not die. In addition, there were differences between medical and nursing staffs' attitudes on several topics. Conclusion(s): Several facilitators and barriers of neonatal palliative care were identified. There were similarities and differences in perceptions of neonatal palliative care between medical and nursing staff. Future work should be done to strengthen facilitators and to mitigate barriers. © Copyright 2020, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers 2020.

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. PedPalASCNET does not hold any rights over the resource listed here. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Citation List Month

July 2020 List

Collection

Citation

Kyc S J; Bruno C J; Shabanova V; Montgomery A M, “Perceptions of neonatal palliative care: Similarities and differences between medical and nursing staff in a level IV neonatal intensive care unit,” Pediatric Palliative Care Library, accessed August 3, 2021, https://pedpalascnetlibrary.omeka.net/items/show/17146.

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