Finding Common Ground: Parents Speak Out About Family-Centered Practices

Title

Finding Common Ground: Parents Speak Out About Family-Centered Practices

Creator

Sax P

Publisher

Journal Of Systemic Therapies

Date

2007

Description

This article offers providers and family-centered systems of care helpful strategies for inviting effective working relationships with parents of young children with mental health concerns based on recommendations provided by parents. These recommendations resulted from a participatory action research project grounded in a narrative therapy approach to exploring three aspects of family-centered practices: (1) effective help-giving, (2) meaningful parent involvement, and (3) parent-to-parent support. Co-researchers—whether parent or professional—shared personal stories and reflections from the perspective of service seekers, and examined their experiences of power relations. This qualitative study demonstrates how cross-pollinating narrative therapy and participatory action research can contribute to knowledge about more equitable participative relationships between seekers of human services and providers and planners of these services. Read More: http://guilfordjournals.com/doi/abs/10.1521/jsyt.2007.26.3.72?journalCode=jsyt This article offers providers and family-centered systems of care helpful strategies for inviting effective working relationships with parents of young children with mental health concerns based on recommendations provided by parents. These recommendations resulted from a participatory action research project grounded in a narrative therapy approach to exploring three aspects of family-centered practices: (1) effective help-giving, (2) meaningful parent involvement, and (3) parent-to-parent support. Co-researchers—whether parent or professional—shared personal stories and reflections from the perspective of service seekers, and examined their experiences of power relations. This qualitative study demonstrates how cross-pollinating narrative therapy and participatory action research can contribute to knowledge about more equitable participative relationships between seekers of human services and providers and planners of these services. Read More: http://guilfordjournals.com/doi/abs/10.1521/jsyt.2007.26.3.72?journalCode=jsyt This article offers providers and family-centered systems of care helpful strategies for inviting effective working relationships with parents of young children with mental health concerns based on recommendations provided by parents. These recommendations resulted from a participatory action research project grounded in a narrative therapy approach to exploring three aspects of family-centered practices: (1) effective help-giving, (2) meaningful parent involvement, and (3) parent-to-parent support. Co-researchers—whether parent or professional—shared personal stories and reflections from the perspective of service seekers, and examined their experiences of power relations. This qualitative study demonstrates how cross-pollinating narrative therapy and participatory action research can contribute to knowledge about more equitable participative relationships between seekers of human services and providers and planners of these services. Read More: http://guilfordjournals.com/doi/abs/10.1521/jsyt.2007.26.3.72?journalCode=jsyt This article offers providers and family-centered systems of care helpful strategies for inviting effective working relationships with parents of young children with mental health concerns based on recommendations provided by parents. These recommendations resulted from a participatory action research project grounded in a narrative therapy approach to exploring three aspects of family-centered practices: (1) effective help-giving, (2) meaningful parent involvement, and (3) parent-to-parent support. Co-researchers—whether parent or professional—shared personal stories and reflections from the perspective of service seekers, and examined their experiences of power relations. This qualitative study demonstrates how cross-pollinating narrative therapy and participatory action research can contribute to knowledge about more equitable participative relationships between seekers of human services and providers and planners of these services. Read More: http://guilfordjournals.com/doi/abs/10.1521/jsyt.2007.26.3.72?journalCode=jsyt This article offers providers and family-centered systems of care helpful strategies for inviting effective working relationships with parents of young children with mental health concerns based on recommendations provided by parents. These recommendations resulted from a participatory action research project grounded in a narrative therapy approach to exploring three aspects of family-centered practices: (1) effective help-giving, (2) meaningful parent involvement, and (3) parent-to-parent support. Co-researchers—whether parent or professional—shared personal stories and reflections from the perspective of service seekers, and examined their experiences of power relations. This qualitative study demonstrates how cross-pollinating narrative therapy and participatory action research can contribute to knowledge about more equitable participative relationships between seekers of human services and providers and planners of these services. Read More: http://guilfordjournals.com/doi/abs/10.1521/jsyt.2007.26.3.72?journalCode=jsyt
2007

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. PedPalASCNET does not hold any rights over the resource listed here. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Type

Journal Article

Citation List Month

Backlog

Volume

26

Citation

Sax P, “Finding Common Ground: Parents Speak Out About Family-Centered Practices,” Pediatric Palliative Care Library, accessed July 2, 2022, https://pedpalascnetlibrary.omeka.net/items/show/13988.

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