Grief Journey: Perception and Response Based on Cultural Beliefs in Thai Women Experiencing Perinatal Death

Title

Grief Journey: Perception and Response Based on Cultural Beliefs in Thai Women Experiencing Perinatal Death

Creator

Nedruetai P; Puangpaka K; Bih-Ching S

Identifier

Publisher

Pacific Rim International Journal of Nursing Research

Date

2022

Subject

Female; Anxiety; Grief; Adult; Health Personnel; Quality of Health Care; Adolescence; Self Concept; Medical Records; Emotions; Interviews; Purposive Sample; Qualitative Studies; Culture; Fear; Descriptive Research; Human; Hope; Reflection; Content Analysis; Field Notes; Evaluation; Hospitals Community; Women; Health Knowledge; Perinatal Death; Psychosocial Factors; Cultural Competence; Cultural Sensitivity; Forgiveness; Self-Talk; Social Norms; Thailand

Description

Studying perinatal death needs to involve cultural beliefs influencing women's perceptions and responses to illuminate their grief journey following the loss of their baby. There is an urgent need to provide a deep understanding in this area that will be useful in meeting the unmet needs of women experiencing perinatal death. This qualitative study explored the grief journey set among cultural beliefs of Thai women experiencing perinatal death. Twenty-five participants who experienced perinatal death between six months and two years before participating in the study were recruited by purposive sampling through the medical history records of four community hospitals in a province of Thailand. Data were collected by in-depth interviews from September 2020 to March 2021 until data saturation. Content analysis was applied to analyze the data. Findings revealed four themes: 1) bewildering in the dark (wondering what is wrong, anxiety and fear about the anticipated loss, flickering hope); 2) grief response (the world suddenly shuts down, overwhelming sorrow); 3) self-reflection (by talking to self, talking to others); and 4) self-healing (compliance with cultural beliefs, the forgiveness of self and others). In conclusion, healthcare providers should be equipped with essential knowledge for addressing issues holistically based on cultural sensitivity that will be useful in enhancing the utmost ability of women in moving through their grief.

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. PedPalASCNET does not hold any rights over the resource listed here. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Collection

Citation

Nedruetai P; Puangpaka K; Bih-Ching S, “Grief Journey: Perception and Response Based on Cultural Beliefs in Thai Women Experiencing Perinatal Death,” Pediatric Palliative Care Library, accessed May 30, 2024, https://pedpalascnetlibrary.omeka.net/items/show/19033.