Shared Spiritual Beliefs between Adolescents with Cancer and Their Families

Title

Shared Spiritual Beliefs between Adolescents with Cancer and Their Families

Creator

Livingston J; Cheng YI; Wang J; Tweddle M; Friebert S; Baker JN; Thompkins J; Lyon ME

Identifier

Publisher

Pediatric Blood and Cancer

Date

2020

Subject

quality of life; Adolescent; Adult; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Male; Prognosis; Decision Making; Longitudinal Studies; Single-Blind Method; Young Adult; Cross-Sectional Studies; Family/psychology; Religion and Medicine; Spirituality; Advance Care Planning/statistics & numerical data; Adolescent Behavior; family; adolescents; cancer; congruence; spirituality; funding from the American Cancer Society to adapt/translate this protocol into; Neoplasms/psychology/therapy; Spanish. There are no other conflicts of interest to disclose.; study from the National Institutes of Health. Maureen E. Lyon is also receiving

Description

BACKGROUND: FAmily CEntered (FACE) Advance Care Planning helps family decision makers to understand and honor patients' preferences for future health care, if patients cannot communicate. Spiritual well-being is a key domain of pediatric oncology care and an integral dimension of pediatric advance care planning. PROCEDURE: As part of four-site randomized controlled trial of FACE for teens with cancer, the functional assessment of chronic illness therapy-spiritual well-being- version 4 (FACIT-Sp-EX-4) was completed independently by 126 adolescents with cancer/family dyads. The prevalence-adjusted and bias-adjusted kappa (PABAK) measured congruence on FACIT-Sp-EX-4. RESULTS: Adolescents (126) had mean age of 16.9 years, were 57% female and 79% White. Religious/spiritual classifications were: Catholic (n = 18), Protestant (n = 76), Mormon (n = 3), none/atheist (n = 22), other (n = 5), and unknown (n = 2). Agreement at item level between spiritual well-being of adolescents and families was assessed. Three items had ≥90% agreement and Excellent PABAK: "I have a reason for living," "I feel loved," "I feel compassion for others in the difficulties they are facing." Three items had <61% agreement and Poor PABAK: "I feel a sense of harmony within myself," "My illness has strengthened my faith or spiritual beliefs," "I feel connected to a higher power (or God)." Dyadic congruence was compared by social-demographics using median one-way analysis. Male family members (median = 72%) were less likely to share spiritual beliefs with their adolescent than female family members (median = 83%), P = .0194. CONCLUSIONS: Family members may not share spiritual beliefs with adolescents and may be unaware of the importance of spiritual well-being for adolescents.

Rights

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Citation List Month

2021 Special Edition - Oncology

Citation

Livingston J; Cheng YI; Wang J; Tweddle M; Friebert S; Baker JN; Thompkins J; Lyon ME, “Shared Spiritual Beliefs between Adolescents with Cancer and Their Families,” Pediatric Palliative Care Library, accessed May 22, 2024, https://pedpalascnetlibrary.omeka.net/items/show/18978.