Impact of Specialized Versus General Palliative Care on the Intensity of Medical Care at the End of Life in Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer: A Population-Based Cohort Study

Title

Impact of Specialized Versus General Palliative Care on the Intensity of Medical Care at the End of Life in Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer: A Population-Based Cohort Study

Creator

Kassam A; Gupta A; Rapoport A; Srikanthan A; Sutradhar R; Luo J; Widger K; Wolfe J; Earle C; Gupta S

Publisher

Journal of Pain and Symptom Management

Date

2022

Description

Outcomes: 1. Explain the impact of specialized palliative care on reducing high-intensity end-of-life care in adolescents and young adults with cancer 2. Identify subpopulations among adolescents and young adults with cancer who are at highest risk for reduced access to specialized palliative care Original Research Background: A high proportion of adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer (ages 15-39 years) receive high-intensity (HI) medical care at the end of life (EOL). We have previously shown that palliative care (PC) involvement in this population is associated with lower risk of HI-EOL care. Whether this association differs by specialized or general PC (SPC, GPC) is unknown. Research Objectives: To evaluate the prevalence and predictors of SPC in AYAs with cancer and to evaluate the impact of SPC versus GPC on the intensity of EOL care for AYAs. Method(s): A decedent cohort of AYAs with cancer who died between 2000 and 2017 in Ontario, Canada was assembled from registries and linked to population-based healthcare data. Based on prior studies, the primary composite measure HI-EOL care included any of intravenous chemotherapy <14 days from death, >1 ED visit, and >1 hospitalization or ICU admission <30 days from death. SPC and GPC were defined via previously validated algorithms based on physician billing codes (SPC if practice consisted of >=50% PC-specific billing codes and GPC if PC-specific billing codes were between 10% and 50%). Result(s): Of 7,122 AYAs, 2,140 (30%) received SPC and 942 (13.2%) received GPC. AYAs with hematologic malignancies, male AYAs, and rural AYAs were least likely to have access to SPC. No PC involvement compared to GPC was associated with higher odds of receiving HI-EOL care (OR 1.5; 95% CI, 1.3-1.8; P <.001). However, SPC was associated with the lowest risk of HI-EOL care (OR vs GPC 0.8; 95% CI, 0.7-0.9; P = 0.007). SPC was also associated with decreased odds of ICU admission compared with GPC (OR 0.7; 95% CI, 0.5-0.9; P = 0.006). Conclusion(s): SPC is associated with a lower risk of HI-EOL care in AYAs with cancer as compared to GPC. However, access to SPC remains a challenge. Implications for Research, Policy, or Practice: Our study supports the widespread provision of SPC to AYAs with cancer. Copyright © 2022

Rights

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Citation List Month

2022 Special Edition 3 - Oncology List

Citation

Kassam A; Gupta A; Rapoport A; Srikanthan A; Sutradhar R; Luo J; Widger K; Wolfe J; Earle C; Gupta S, “Impact of Specialized Versus General Palliative Care on the Intensity of Medical Care at the End of Life in Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer: A Population-Based Cohort Study,” Pediatric Palliative Care Library, accessed February 25, 2024, https://pedpalascnetlibrary.omeka.net/items/show/18643.