Intensity of Vasopressor Therapy and In-Hospital Mortality for Infants and Children: An Opportunity for Counseling Families

Title

Intensity of Vasopressor Therapy and In-Hospital Mortality for Infants and Children: An Opportunity for Counseling Families

Creator

Aziz KB; Boss RD; Yarborough CC; Raisanen JC; Neubauer K; Donohue PK

Publisher

Journal of Pain and Symptom Management

Date

2021

Subject

decision making; hospital mortality; hydrocortisone; pediatrics; vasopressors

Description

Context: Most pediatric deaths occur in an intensive care unit, and treatment specific predictors of mortality could help clinicians and families make informed decisions. Objective(s): To investigate whether the intensity of vasopressor therapy for pediatric patients, regardless of diagnosis, predicts in-hospital mortality. Method(s): Single-center, retrospective medical chart review of children aged 0-17 who were admitted between 2005 and 2015 at a pediatric tertiary care center in the U.S. and received any vasopressor medication-dopamine, dobutamine, epinephrine, vasopressin, norepinephrine, or hydrocortisone. Result(s): During the 10-year period, 1654 patients received at least one vasopressor medication during a hospitalization. Median age at the time of hospitalization was three months, and the median duration of hospitalization was 23 days; 8% of patients had two to five hospitalizations in which they received vasopressors. There were 176 total patients who died while receiving vasopressors; most (93%) died during their first hospitalization. The most common diagnosis was sepsis (34%), followed by congenital heart disease (17%). Dopamine was the most commonly prescribed first-line vasopressor (70%), and hydrocortisone was the most commonly prescribed second-line vasopressor (49%) for all pediatric patients. The incidence of mortality rose sequentially with escalating vasopressor support, increasing from under 10% with the first vasopressor to 48% at the maximum number of agents. The odds of death almost doubled with the addition of each new vasopressor. Conclusion(s): The intensity of vasopressor therapy for pediatric patients, regardless of diagnosis, is associated with in-hospital mortality; vasopressor escalation should trigger intensive palliative care supports. Copyright © 2020 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. PedPalASCNET does not hold any rights over the resource listed here. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Citation List Month

June 2021 List

Collection

Citation

Aziz KB; Boss RD; Yarborough CC; Raisanen JC; Neubauer K; Donohue PK, “Intensity of Vasopressor Therapy and In-Hospital Mortality for Infants and Children: An Opportunity for Counseling Families,” Pediatric Palliative Care Library, accessed July 4, 2022, https://pedpalascnetlibrary.omeka.net/items/show/17559.

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