End of life care in children with neurodisability and concurrent palliative care needs: An audit of local Paediatric palliative services

Title

End of life care in children with neurodisability and concurrent palliative care needs: An audit of local Paediatric palliative services

Creator

Hqli F; Santhanam G

Publisher

Archives of Disease in Childhood

Date

2019

Subject

child; female; human; male; palliative therapy; awareness; clinical article; terminal care; pain; school child; conference abstract; decision making; monitoring; Canavan disease; cerebral palsy; disorders of mitochondrial functions; documentation; medical specialist; nutrition; Rett syndrome; secondary health care; seizure; social care; spinal muscular atrophy

Description

Aims A proportion of children with neurodisability will have life-limiting conditions, whereby their complex continuing needs increase the intricacy and urgency for providing comprehensive supportive care to these families. Equal access to universal and specialist paediatric palliative care (PPC) services should therefore be available depending on the child's needs. In our local borough there is a distinct group of children with complex neurodisabilities requiring input from hospital and community paediatricians, and the specialist PPC team. This audit aims to assess whether the current palliative care provided to these children is meeting the standards set by NICE guidance (2016). Methods Approval was granted by the Clinical Effectiveness Unit and audit lead locally. Standards set by NICE guidance (NG61) were used, with a target compliance of 100%. Eleven children were identified to have a neurodisability with ongoing PPC input. Primary and secondary care health records were used for collection of data, which was subsequently analysed on a password-protected spreadsheet. Results There were nine males and two females, with a mean age of 10.44 years. Underlying diagnoses include cerebral palsy (n=4); leukodystrophy (n=2); spinal muscular atrophy, movement disorder, Canavan syndrome, mitochondrial disease, and Rett syndrome (n=1 each). All children were enterally fed. Four areas of interest within the NICE guidance were identified for data collection: care planning and support, Advance Care Plan (ACP), symptom management, and input from the PPC team. Results showed that symptoms, growth and nutrition, and social care needs were addressed in all children (100%). 82% were reviewed by the PPC team in the past year; 88% had their medications adjusted accordingly when appropriate; and 91% had an ACP in place. Conclusions This audit demonstrated parents' and carers' involvement in the decision-making process for the child and their awareness of the child's life-limiting condition; adequate management of symptoms, monitoring of growth and nutrition; and the presence of an ACP in most children. Identified areas for development include having a named medical specialist for each child; regular review of the ACP by the PPC team; and clear documentation of seizure management in the child's ACP, and the stepwise management of pain.

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. PedPalASCNET does not hold any rights over the resource listed here. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Citation List Month

August 2019 List

Collection

Citation

Hqli F; Santhanam G, “End of life care in children with neurodisability and concurrent palliative care needs: An audit of local Paediatric palliative services,” Pediatric Palliative Care Library, accessed August 1, 2021, https://pedpalascnetlibrary.omeka.net/items/show/16489.

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