End-of-life decision making in Taiwan: healthcare practice is rooted in local culture and laws that should be adjusted to patients' best interests

Title

End-of-life decision making in Taiwan: healthcare practice is rooted in local culture and laws that should be adjusted to patients' best interests

Creator

Tang Siew Tzuh

Publisher

Journal Of Medical Ethics

Date

2013

Subject

Female; Humans; Male; Terminal Care; decision making; Attitude of Health Personnel; Medical Staff; Attitude to Death; Resuscitation Orders; Neonatology; Nursing Staff; Hospital

Description

The observed Taiwanese neonatal professionals' more conservative attitudes than their worldwide colleagues towards end-of-life (EOL) decision making may stem from cultural attitudes toward death in children and concerns about medicolegal liability. Healthcare practice is rooted in local culture and laws; however that should be adjusted to patients' best interests. Improving Taiwanese neonatal professionals' knowledge and competence in EOL care may minimize ethical dilemmas, allow appropriate EOL care decision making, avoid infants' suffering, and ease parents' bereavement grief.
2013-06

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. PedPalASCNET does not hold any rights over the resource listed here. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Type

Journal Article

Citation List Month

Backlog

Pages

387-388

Issue

6

Volume

39

Citation

Tang Siew Tzuh, “End-of-life decision making in Taiwan: healthcare practice is rooted in local culture and laws that should be adjusted to patients' best interests,” Pediatric Palliative Care Library, accessed July 24, 2021, https://pedpalascnetlibrary.omeka.net/items/show/14698.

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