Hidden consequences of success in pediatrics: parental health-related quality of life--results from the Care Project

Title

Hidden consequences of success in pediatrics: parental health-related quality of life--results from the Care Project

Creator

Hatzmann J; Heymans HS; Ferrer-i-Carbonell A; van Praag BM; Grootenhuis MA

Publisher

Pediatrics

Date

2008

Subject

Child; Female; Humans; Male; Adult; Health Care Surveys; Parents; Middle Aged; Health Status; Family Health; quality of life; adolescent; Preschool; infant; Chronic disease; retrospective studies; caregivers

Description

CONTEXT: The number of parents who care for a chronically ill child is increasing. Because of advances in medical care, parental caring tasks are changing. A detailed description of parental health-related quality of life will add to the understanding of the impact of caring for a chronically ill child. This will contribute to pediatric family care. OBJECTIVE: Our goal was to determine the health-related quality of life of parents of chronically ill children compared with parents of healthy schoolchildren. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: A survey of 533 parents of children with chronic conditions (10 diagnosis groups, children aged 1-19 years, diagnosed >1 year ago, living at home) and 443 parents of schoolchildren was conducted between January 2006 and September 2007. Parents were approached through Emma Children's Hospital (which has a tertiary referral and a regional function) and through parent associations. The comparison group included parents of healthy schoolchildren. Health-related quality of life was assessed with the TNO-AZL Questionnaire for Adult's Health Related Quality of Life. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Health-related quality of life measures gross and fine motor function, cognitive functioning, sleep, pain, social functioning, daily activities, sexuality, vitality, positive and depressive emotions, and aggressiveness. The health-related quality of life of the study group was compared with that of the comparison group, and effect sizes were estimated. The percentages of parents at risk for a low health-related quality of life were compared with the 25th percentile scores of the comparison group. RESULTS. Parents of chronically ill children had a significantly lower health-related quality of life. Subgroup analysis showed lower health-related quality of life on sleep, social functioning, daily activities, vitality, positive emotions, and depressive emotions in disease-specific groups. On average, 45% of the parents were at risk for health-related quality-of-life impairment. CONCLUSIONS: Parents of chronically ill children report a seriously lower health-related quality of life, which should receive attention and supportive care if necessary. A family-centered approach in pediatrics is recommended.
2008

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. PedPalASCNET does not hold any rights over the resource listed here. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Type

Journal Article

Citation List Month

Backlog

Pages

e1030-8

Issue

5

Volume

122

Citation

Hatzmann J; Heymans HS; Ferrer-i-Carbonell A; van Praag BM; Grootenhuis MA, “Hidden consequences of success in pediatrics: parental health-related quality of life--results from the Care Project,” Pediatric Palliative Care Library, accessed August 1, 2021, https://pedpalascnetlibrary.omeka.net/items/show/13970.

Social Bookmarking