Quantitative sensory testing in children with migraine: Preliminary evidence for enhanced sensitivity to painful stimuli especially in girls

Title

Quantitative sensory testing in children with migraine: Preliminary evidence for enhanced sensitivity to painful stimuli especially in girls

Creator

Zohsel K; Hohmeister J; Oelkers-Ax R; Flor H; Hermann C

Publisher

Pain

Date

2006

Subject

PedPal Lit

Description

Recent studies showed an enhanced general sensitivity to painful stimuli in adult migraineurs during as well as between attacks. Yet, the influence of a prolonged pain history and potential sex differences has not been studied. We used quantitative sensory testing to examine 25 children with migraine between attacks and 28 controls (age 9-15). The assessment included the measurement of heat and mechanical pain thresholds as well as measures of perceptual sensitization in response to repetitive (mechanical) or tonic (thermal) noxious stimulation at both trigeminal and thenar sites. In addition, the mother was either present or absent during the measurements. Heat pain thresholds were not significantly different between the two groups. However, the child migraineurs showed significantly lower mechanical pain thresholds. Children and especially girls with migraine displayed significantly more sensitization to a tonic heat stimulus at the trigeminal site when the mother was present. The migraineurs also showed a trend towards higher sensitization ratings for mechanical stimuli. Overall, heat pain thresholds were significantly higher in the presence of the mother. In the migraine group only, mechanical pain thresholds were significantly higher when the mother was present. To summarize, an enhanced sensitivity to painful stimuli can already be observed in children suffering from migraine for an average duration of 4.4 years. This may be the result of sensitization in nociceptive pain pathways caused by frequent pain experiences. Girls with migraine were more prone to such sensitization, which may increase their risk for continuing to suffer from migraine throughout adulthood.
2006

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. PedPalASCNET does not hold any rights over the resource listed here. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Type

Journal Article

Citation

Zohsel K; Hohmeister J; Oelkers-Ax R; Flor H; Hermann C, “Quantitative sensory testing in children with migraine: Preliminary evidence for enhanced sensitivity to painful stimuli especially in girls,” Pediatric Palliative Care Library, accessed May 27, 2024, https://pedpalascnetlibrary.omeka.net/items/show/13185.