Conflict in the care of patients with prolonged stay in the ICU: types, sources, and predictors

Title

Conflict in the care of patients with prolonged stay in the ICU: types, sources, and predictors

Creator

Studdert DM; Mello MM; Burns JP; Puopolo AL; Galper BZ; Truog RD; Brennan T

Publisher

Intensive Care Medicine

Date

2003

Subject

Female; Humans; Male; Adult; Prospective Studies; Aged; Middle Aged; Family Relations; Professional-Family Relations; Boston; Communication Barriers; Length of Stay; Dissent and Disputes; Interprofessional Relations; Time Factors; Reproducibility of Results; Case-Control Studies; 80 and over; decision making; ICU Decision Making; Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data; Intensive Care/statistics & numerical data

Description

OBJECTIVE: To determine types, sources, and predictors of conflicts among patients with prolonged stay in the ICU. DESIGN AND SETTING: We prospectively identified conflicts by interviewing treating physicians and nurses at two stages during the patients' stays. We then classified conflicts by type and source and used a case-control design to identify predictors of team-family conflicts. DESIGN AND SETTING: Seven medical and surgical ICUs at four teaching hospitals in Boston, USA. PATIENTS: All patients admitted to the participating ICUs over an 11-month period whose stay exceeded the 85th percentile length of stay for their respective unit ( n=656). MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: Clinicians identified 248 conflicts involving 209 patients; hence, nearly one-third of patients had conflict associated with their care: 142 conflicts (57%) were team-family disputes, 76 (31%) were intrateam disputes, and 30 (12%) occurred among family members. Disagreements over life-sustaining treatment led to 63 team-family conflicts (44%). Other leading sources were poor communication (44%), the unavailability of family decision makers (15%), and the surrogates' (perceived) inability to make decisions (16%). Nurses detected all types of conflict more frequently than physicians, especially intrateam conflicts. The presence of a spouse reduced the probability of team-family conflict generally (odds ratio 0.64) and team-family disputes over life-sustaining treatment specifically (odds ratio 0.49). CONCLUSIONS: Conflict is common in the care of patients with prolonged stays in the ICU. However, efforts to improve the quality of care for critically ill patients that focus on team-family disagreements over life-sustaining treatment miss significant discord in a variety of other areas.
2003

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. PedPalASCNET does not hold any rights over the resource listed here. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Type

Journal Article

Citation List Month

Backlog

Pages

1489-1497

Issue

9

Volume

29

Citation

Studdert DM; Mello MM; Burns JP; Puopolo AL; Galper BZ; Truog RD; Brennan T, “Conflict in the care of patients with prolonged stay in the ICU: types, sources, and predictors,” Pediatric Palliative Care Library, accessed October 23, 2021, https://pedpalascnetlibrary.omeka.net/items/show/13077.

Social Bookmarking