Ethical problems in pediatric critical care: consent

Title

Ethical problems in pediatric critical care: consent

Creator

Zawistowski CA; Frader JE

Publisher

Critical Care Medicine

Date

2003

Subject

Child; Humans; United States; Intensive Care Units; Parental Consent; Personal Autonomy; Physician's Role; Ethics; decision making; Clinical; ICU Decision Making; Informed Consent/ethics/legislation & jurisprudence; Minors/legislation & jurisprudence; Pediatric/ethics/legislation & jurisprudence

Description

Informed consent constitutes one of the important considerations included in the myriad ethical dilemmas in the pediatric intensive care unit. Traditionally, the law has viewed children as incompetent to make medical decisions, and society has authorized parents or guardians to act on behalf of children. Empirical evidence has revealed that children may be more capable of participating in their medical decisions than previously thought. Some scholars now think that parents have the right to give informed permission and that professionals should seek the child's assent in many circumstances. Physicians in the intensive care unit should seriously consider consulting adolescent patients about the direction of their care and may wish to seek the input of younger patients in appropriate circumstances.
2003

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. PedPalASCNET does not hold any rights over the resource listed here. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Type

Journal Article

Citation List Month

Backlog

Pages

S407-10

Issue

5

Volume

31

Citation

Zawistowski CA; Frader JE, “Ethical problems in pediatric critical care: consent,” Pediatric Palliative Care Library, accessed December 8, 2021, https://pedpalascnetlibrary.omeka.net/items/show/12814.

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