Patterns of children's coping with life stress: implications for clinicians

Title

Patterns of children's coping with life stress: implications for clinicians

Creator

Donaldson D; Prinstein MJ; Danovsky M; Spirito A

Identifier

Publisher

The American Journal Of Orthopsychiatry

Date

2000

Subject

Child; Female; Humans; Male; Personality Inventory; Defense Mechanisms; Stress; adolescent; Adaptation; Psychological; Psychological/psychology

Description

In a study of children's patterns of coping with daily stressors, boys and girls 9-17 years old were asked to complete a coping checklist in response to one of four types of stressors--school, parents/family, siblings, or peer/interpersonal. Patterns of coping-strategy use were found to be similar across the various stressors, with wishful thinking, problem-solving, and emotional regulation being among those most frequently used. Older adolescents, compared to younger children, tended to use a broader range of coping strategies, regardless of stressor. Implications for clinical practice are discussed.
2000

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. PedPalASCNET does not hold any rights over the resource listed here. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Type

Journal Article

Citation List Month

Backlog

Pages

351-359

Issue

3

Volume

70

Citation

Donaldson D; Prinstein MJ; Danovsky M; Spirito A, “Patterns of children's coping with life stress: implications for clinicians,” Pediatric Palliative Care Library, accessed July 26, 2021, https://pedpalascnetlibrary.omeka.net/items/show/12159.

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