The perceived benefit scales: measuring perceived positive life changes after negative events

Title

The perceived benefit scales: measuring perceived positive life changes after negative events

Creator

McMillen JC; Fisher R

Publisher

Social Work Research

Date

1998

Subject

Life Change Events; Depression; Anxiety; Psychology; Statistical; Psychological; Stress; Factor Analysis

Description

The article focuses on a study that introduced measures of self-reported positive life changes after negative events. The study of the psychosocial consequences of negative events has been conducted largely using a deficit approach. In the past three decades, bodies of literature have developed for all relatively common negative events, from rape to cancer. Using a deficit approach, individuals who experienced these events are described in terms of their depression, anxiety, suicidal ideation, and other negative symptoms. These negative descriptions may influence the way human services professionals view their clients and how people who experience these events view themselves. as negative outcomes. In the article, new measures of self-reported positive life changes after traumatic stressors are introduced. Factor analyses suggest that the Perceived Benefit Scales consist of eight subscales: lifestyle changes; material gain; and increases in self-efficacy, family closeness, community closeness, faith in people, compassion, and spirituality. Internal consistency and test-retest coefficients range from adequate to excellent. The scales correlate with indicators of severity and differ by type of negative event experienced.
1998

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. PedPalASCNET does not hold any rights over the resource listed here. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Type

Journal Article

Citation List Month

Backlog

Pages

173-187

Volume

22

Citation

McMillen JC; Fisher R, “The perceived benefit scales: measuring perceived positive life changes after negative events,” Pediatric Palliative Care Library, accessed October 17, 2021, https://pedpalascnetlibrary.omeka.net/items/show/12031.

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