Anticonvulsant drugs for management of pain: a systematic review

Title

Anticonvulsant drugs for management of pain: a systematic review

Creator

McQuay H; Carroll D; Jadad AR; Wiffen P; Moore A

Publisher

British Medical Journal

Date

1995

Subject

Treatment Outcome; Non-U.S. Gov't; Human; Anticonvulsants/tu [Therapeutic Use]; Anticonvulsants/ae [Adverse Effects]; Support; Pain/dt [Drug Therapy]; Carbamazepine/ae [Adverse Effects]; Carbamazepine/tu [Therapeutic Use]; Clonazepam/ae [Adverse Effects]; Clonazepam/tu [Therapeutic Use]; Diabetic Neuropathies/dt [Drug Therapy]; Phenytoin/ae [Adverse Effects]; Phenytoin/tu [Therapeutic Use]; Trigeminal Neuralgia/dt [Drug Therapy]; Valproic Acid/ae [Adverse Effects]; Valproic Acid/tu [Therapeutic Use]

Description

OBJECTIVE--To determine effectiveness and adverse effects of anticonvulsant drugs in management of pain. DESIGN--Systematic review of randomised controlled trials of anticonvulsants for acute, chronic, or cancer pain identified by using Medline, by hand searching, by searching reference lists, and by contacting investigators. SUBJECTS--Between 1966 and February 1994, 37 reports were found; 20 reports, of four anticonvulsants, were eligible. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Numbers needed to treat were calculated for effectiveness, adverse effects, and drug related withdrawal from study. RESULTS--The only placebo controlled study in acute pain found no analgesic effect of sodium valproate. For treating trigeminal neuralgia, carbamazepine had a combined number needed to treat of 2.6 for effectiveness, 3.4 for adverse effects, and 24 for severe effects (withdrawal from study). For treating diabetic neuropathy, anticonvulsants had a combined number needed to treat of 2.5 for effectiveness, 3.1 for adverse effects, and 20 for severe effects. For migraine prophylaxis, anticonvulsants had a combined number needed to treat of 1.6 for effectiveness, 2.4 for adverse effects, and 39 for severe effects. Phenytoin had no effect on the irritable bowel syndrome, and carbamazepine had little effect on pain after stroke. Clonazepam was effective in one study for temporomandibular joint dysfunction. No study compared one anticonvulsant with another. CONCLUSIONS--Anticonvulsants were effective for trigeminal neuralgia and diabetic neuropathy and for migraine prophylaxis. Minor adverse effects occurred as often as benefit. [References: 53]
1995

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. PedPalASCNET does not hold any rights over the resource listed here. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Type

Journal Article

Citation List Month

Backlog

Pages

1047-1052

Issue

7012

Volume

311

Citation

McQuay H; Carroll D; Jadad AR; Wiffen P; Moore A, “Anticonvulsant drugs for management of pain: a systematic review,” Pediatric Palliative Care Library, accessed September 21, 2021, https://pedpalascnetlibrary.omeka.net/items/show/11895.

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