Shades of truth: Cultural and psychological factors affecting communication in pediatric palliative care

Title

Shades of truth: Cultural and psychological factors affecting communication in pediatric palliative care

Creator

Hatano Y; Yamada M; Fukui K

Publisher

Journal Of Pain And Symptom Management

Date

2011

Subject

Palliative Care; Pediatrics; Communication; Charting the Territory; Neoplasms; Best Practices (Davies); truth telling; clinical ethics; cultural factors; hepatoblastoma; Professional Ethics; Sociocultural Factors; Truth

Description

Communication with children who have life-threatening illnesses is a major challenge. Communication practices are greatly influenced by factors such as the child’s age, the parents’ wishes, and the cultural norms. This article presents the case of a 12-year-old Japanese boy with advanced hepatoblastoma. The patient also was diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome, which impairs interpersonal communication. The case is discussed from the perspective of clinical ethics, especially with regard to truth telling. The health care team faced an ethical dilemma because of the complications involved. Physicians treating children with cancer should be aware of these issues to be able to effectively communicate with their patients. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved) (journal abstract)

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. PedPalASCNET does not hold any rights over the resource listed here. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Type

Journal Article

Citation

Hatano Y; Yamada M; Fukui K, “Shades of truth: Cultural and psychological factors affecting communication in pediatric palliative care,” Pediatric Palliative Care Library, accessed October 23, 2021, https://pedpalascnetlibrary.omeka.net/items/show/11514.

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