Patterns of Care at the End of Life for Children and Young Adults with Life-Threatening Complex Chronic Conditions

Title

Patterns of Care at the End of Life for Children and Young Adults with Life-Threatening Complex Chronic Conditions

Creator

DeCourcey DD; Silverman M; Oladunjoye A; Balkin Emily M; Wolfe J

Publisher

The Journal Of Pediatrics

Date

2017

Subject

medical record; palliative therapy; Terminal Care; brain disease; central nervous system disease; Child; chromosome disorder; comfort; Death; Drug withdrawal; Female; Human; Intensive care unit; life sustaining treatment; lung disease; major clinical study; Male; Resuscitation; Study Design; Young Adult

Description

OBJECTIVE: To characterize patterns of care at the end of life for children and young adults with life-threatening complex chronic conditions (LT-CCCs) and to compare them by LT-CCC type. STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey of bereaved parents (n = 114; response rate of 54%) of children with noncancer, noncardiac LT-CCCs who received care at a quaternary care children's hospital and medical record abstraction. RESULTS: The majority of children with LT-CCCs died in the hospital (62.7%) with more than one-half (53.3%) dying in the intensive care unit. Those with static encephalopathy (AOR, 0.19; 95% CI, 0.04-0.98), congenital and chromosomal disorders (AOR, 0.28; 95% CI, 0.09-0.91), and pulmonary disorders (AOR, 0.08; 95% CI, 0.01-0.77) were significantly less likely to die at home compared with those with progressive central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Almost 50% of patients died after withdrawal or withholding of life-sustaining therapies, 17.5% died during active resuscitation, and 36% died while receiving comfort care only. The mode of death varied widely across LT-CCCs, with no patients with pulmonary disorders dying receiving comfort care only compared with 66.7% of those with CNS progressive disorders. A majority of patients had palliative care involvement (79.3%); however, in multivariable analyses, there was distinct variation in receipt of palliative care across LT-CCCs, with patients having CNS static encephalopathy (AOR, 0.07; 95% CI, 0.01-0.68) and pulmonary disorders (AOR, 0.07; 95% CI, 0.01-.09) significantly less likely to have palliative care involvement than those with CNS progressive disorders. CONCLUSIONS: Significant differences in patterns of care at the end of life exist depending on LT-CCC type. Attention to these patterns is important to ensure equal access to palliative care and targeted improvements in end-of-life care for these populations.

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. PedPalASCNET does not hold any rights over the resource listed here. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Citation List Month

January 2018 List

Collection

Citation

DeCourcey DD; Silverman M; Oladunjoye A; Balkin Emily M; Wolfe J, “Patterns of Care at the End of Life for Children and Young Adults with Life-Threatening Complex Chronic Conditions,” Pediatric Palliative Care Library, accessed July 27, 2021, https://pedpalascnetlibrary.omeka.net/items/show/11220.

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