A Study Into The Educational Needs Of Children's Hospice Doctors: A Descriptive Quantitative And Qualitative Survey

Title

A Study Into The Educational Needs Of Children's Hospice Doctors: A Descriptive Quantitative And Qualitative Survey

Creator

Amery J; Lapwood S

Identifier

10.1191/0269216304pm902oa

Publisher

Palliative Medicine

Date

2004

Subject

Clinical Competence/st [standards]; Education Medical Continuing/og [organization & Administration]; Inservice Training/og [organization & Administration]; Palliative Care/st [standards]; Pediatrics/ed [education]; Child; Communication; England; Hospice Care; Hospices; Humans; Only Child; Palliative Care; Patient Care Team; Surveys And Questionnaires

Description

OBJECTIVES: To identify and explore the educational needs of children's hospice doctors in England. DESIGN: A descriptive quantitative and qualitative survey. SETTING: Children's hospices in England. PARTICIPANTS: All children's hospice doctors (n =55) in England were approached, and 35 (65%) consented. INTERVENTIONS: A questionnaire designed to survey doctors' self-assessed educational competencies (confidence and perceived need for training) in subject areas derived from analysis of existing children's palliative care literature. Educational diaries used prospectively in practice to identify areas of unmet educational need. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Self-perceived confidence and usefulness scores for each subject area. An analysis of support, education and training needs deriving from educational diaries and one-to-one interviews. RESULTS: Confidence and usefulness scores suggest that respondents would most value support, education and training in the management of emergencies, symptoms and physical disease. Educational diary analysis revealed that respondents would most value support, education and training in communication skills, team-working skills, and personal coping strategies. CONCLUSIONS: There is a disparity between educational needs as derived from self-rated competencies and from educational diary keeping; suggesting that children's hospice doctors may not be fully aware of their own educational, support and training needs. Self-rated competencies emphasise the value of education in craft or clinical skills; whereas personal diary keeping emphasises the value of education in intrapersonal and interpersonal skills such as communication, team-working and personal coping skills. The current curricula and educational resources need to acknowledge that interpersonal and intrapersonal competencies are as important as clinical competencies. While the study looks particularly at the educational needs of children's hospice doctors, readers may feel that the findings are of relevance to all specialities and disciplines.

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. PedPalASCNET does not hold any rights over the resource listed here. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Citation List Month

May 2017 List

Citation

Amery J; Lapwood S, “A Study Into The Educational Needs Of Children's Hospice Doctors: A Descriptive Quantitative And Qualitative Survey,” Pediatric Palliative Care Library, accessed November 27, 2021, https://pedpalascnetlibrary.omeka.net/items/show/10934.

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