"you Don't Know Until You Get There": The Positive And Negative "lived" Experience Of Parenting An Adult Child With 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

Title

"you Don't Know Until You Get There": The Positive And Negative "lived" Experience Of Parenting An Adult Child With 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

Creator

Goodwin J; McCormack L; Campbell LE

Identifier

DOI: 10.1037/hea0000415

Publisher

Health Psychology

Date

2016

Subject

22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome; Ipa; Developmental-disabilities; Mothers; Stress; Psychology Clinical; Velo-cardio-facial Syndrome; Trauma; Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis; Velo-cardio-facial Syndrome; Families; Psychological Growth; Psychology; Symptoms; Prevalence; Disorders; Traumatic Distress
Ipa; Velo-cardio-facial Syndrome; 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome; Traumatic Distress; Psychological Growth

Description

OBJECTIVES:
22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), a complex genetic syndrome associated with more than 180 features, presents complex challenges for parents including gaining a diagnosis. This phenomenological study sought the "lived" interpretations of parents supporting an adult child with 22q11DS, a poorly researched area.
METHOD:
Interpretative phenomenological analysis informed a detailed and open exploration of parenting a child through to adult life with 22q11DS. Using in-depth semistructured interviews, 8 parents (2 male, 6 female) of adult children with 22q11DS were individually interviewed; providing the data set for transcription and thematic analysis.
RESULTS:
Losing "I" Finding "self," overarched 6 subordinate themes that emerged from participants' articulated descriptions of psychological distress and psychological growth. Distress in parenting a child with 22q11DS was experienced through stigma, loss, grief, and guilt. Progressively, stigma undermined independence, friendships, and instinctual judgement. Ill-informed hierarchical structures experienced as layers of obstruction and lack of awareness of the syndrome triggered angry advocacy for their child. Diagnosis brought opposing relief and grief. In time, they came to value their unique "accomplishments," collected on their journey with 22q11DS, and in turn, consciously valued authentic "self" expressed through empathy, humility, gratitude, and pride.
CONCLUSION:
Parental distress through societal, educational, and health care invalidation persisted for decades for all participants. Conversely, distress facilitated psychological growth for redefining "self" and role as parents over time. Building on this phenomenological cameo, future research can educate against the plight of 22q11DS families. It can enlighten health care professionals in buffering against associated stigma, blame, and self-doubt, and in fostering psychological well-being. (PsycINFO Database Record

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. PedPalASCNET does not hold any rights over the resource listed here. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Citation List Month

September 2016 List

Citation

Goodwin J; McCormack L; Campbell LE, “"you Don't Know Until You Get There": The Positive And Negative "lived" Experience Of Parenting An Adult Child With 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.,” Pediatric Palliative Care Library, accessed May 23, 2022, https://pedpalascnetlibrary.omeka.net/items/show/10666.

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