Listening To Parents: The Role Of Symptom Perception In Pediatric Palliative Home Care

Title

Listening To Parents: The Role Of Symptom Perception In Pediatric Palliative Home Care

Creator

Vollenbroich R; Borasio GD; Duroux A; Grasser M; Brandstatter M; Fuhrer M

Identifier

DOI: 10.1017/S1478951515000462

Publisher

Palliative & Supportive Care

Date

2016

Subject

Adult; Cross-sectional Studies; Death; Dyspnea/diagnosis; Dyspnea/psychology; Female; Home Care Services/standards; Humans; Male; Pain/diagnosis; Pain/psychology; Palliative Care/methods; Palliative Care/psychology; Parents/psychology; Pediatrics/methods; Perception; Quality Of Life/psychology; Retrospective Studies; Surveys And Questionnaires; Symptom Assessment/psychology
End-of-life Symptoms; Pediatric Palliative Home Care; Symptom Perception

Description

OBJECTIVE:
This study analyzes symptom perception by parents and healthcare professionals and the quality of symptom management in a pediatric palliative home care setting and identifies which factors contribute to a high quality of palliative and end-of-life care for children.
METHODS:
In this retrospective, cross-sectional study, parents were surveyed at the earliest three months after their child's death. All children were cared for by a specialized home pediatric palliative care team that provides a 24/7 medical on-call service. Questionnaires assessed symptom prevalence and intensity during the child's last month of life as perceived by parents, symptom perception, and treatment by medical staff. The responses were correlated with essential palliative care outcome measures (e.g., satisfaction with the care provided, quality-of-life of affected children and parents, and peacefulness of the dying phase).
RESULTS:
Thirty-eight parent dyads participated (return rate 84%; 35% oncological disorders). According to parental report, dyspnea (61%) and pain (58%) were the dominant symptoms with an overall high symptom load (83%). Pain, agitation, and seizures could be treated more successfully than other symptoms. Successful symptom perception was achieved in most cases and predicted the quality of symptom treatment (R 2, 0.612). Concordant assessment of symptom severity between parents and healthcare professionals (HCPs) improved the satisfaction with the care provided (p = 0.037) as well as the parental quality-of-life (p = 0.041). Even in cases with unsuccessful symptom control, parents were very satisfied with the SHPPC team's care (median 10; numeric rating scale 0-10) and rated the child's death as highly peaceful (median 9). Significance of the results: The quality and the concordance of symptom perception between parents and HCPs essentially influence parental quality-of-life as well as parental satisfaction and constitute a predictive factor for the quality of symptom treatment and palliative care.

Rights

Article information provided for research and reference use only. PedPalASCNET does not hold any rights over the resource listed here. All rights are retained by the journal listed under publisher and/or the creator(s).

Citation List Month

November 2016 List

Citation

Vollenbroich R; Borasio GD; Duroux A; Grasser M; Brandstatter M; Fuhrer M, “Listening To Parents: The Role Of Symptom Perception In Pediatric Palliative Home Care,” Pediatric Palliative Care Library, accessed August 1, 2021, https://pedpalascnetlibrary.omeka.net/items/show/10636.

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