Browse Items (38 total)

This article will cover the special considerations, challenges, and opportunities presented by caring for adolescents and young adults with life-threatening illnesses when the possibility of transition to an adult care setting arises.

Fatigue is one of the most prevalent symptoms in patients with a life-threatening illness. Untreated, fatigue can impair quality of life and prohibit addressing practical needs, psychosocial and spiritual distress, and opportunities for growth and…

Despite the detail that is provided on the potential negative outcomes of children and families who have chronic illnesses, most of these families show admirable resilience. Most children adjust to their illnesses within 1 year and most families…

In an ideal world, all of us - patients, parents, family members, nurses, physicians, social workers, therapists, pastoral care workers, and others - would always work together in a collaborative manner to provide the best care possible. This article…

Gastrointestinal symptoms are suffered commonly by children at the end of life. Diagnosis and management of these common symptoms include careful history and physical examination to assess for possible causes

The experience of compassion fatigue is an expected and common response to the professional task of routinely caring for children at the end of life. Symptoms of compassion fatigue often mimic trauma reactions. Implementing strategies that span…

A significant component of palliative care is the prompt diagnosis and management of distress, anxiety, and depression. This article reviews the symptoms and treatment of anxiety and depressive disorders in children at the end of life. Distinguishing…

Most childhood deaths in the United States occur in hospitals. Pediatric intensive care clinicians must anticipate and effectively treat dying children's pain and suffering and support the psychosocial and spiritual needs of families. These actions…

High-quality palliative care is the standard for children with life-threatening illness, especially when a cure is not possible. This review outlines a model for clinical practice that integrates clinical, psychosocial, and ethical concerns at the…

Advanced technology and better scientific understanding of mechanisms of disease now permit intensive care personnel to extend life beyond what some patients and families consider reasonable, leading, in part, to the "patients' rights" movement and…

There are many ways to add to children's quality of life within the hospital environment. Inpatient settings offer both opportunities and challenges with respect to providing care to children with life-threatening illnesses. The barriers to pediatric…

Children and adolescents with complex chronic conditions often receive pediatric palliative care (PPC) from health care professionals. However, children's needs exist both in a health care context and in the community where children interact with…

Children and adolescents with complex chronic conditions often receive pediatric palliative care (PPC) from health care professionals. However, children's needs exist both in a health care context and in the community where children interact with…

Most parents of children with cancer have dual primary goals: a primary cancer-directed goal of cure and a primary comfort-related goal of lessening suffering. Early introduction of palliative care principles and practices into their child's…

The interdisciplinary approach is a cornerstone of a well-functioning pediatric palliative care team. These teams are most often available as an inpatient consultation service, are composed of professionals representing multiple disciplines, and are…

The medical practitioner in the community is in a unique position to assist children and their families from the time of diagnosis with a life-threatening condition through to the end of life. The purpose of this article is to inform medical…

In spite of the many possible methods of pain control in the burned child satisfactory pain management may still be a problem, at times formidable. The most fruitful approach would seem to be frequent assessment of pain in the individual patient with…

Palliative care for children is complex and focuses on patients' comfort. Some of the most troublesome symptoms as patients approach the end of life are seizures, agitation, and spasticity. Many doctors caring for children at the end of life are…

The focus of critical care has evolved from saving lives to preservation of function. Morbidity rates in pediatric critical care are approximately double mortality rates. Morbidity includes complications of disease and medical care. In pediatric…

Prenatal diagnosis of a lethal anomaly is a monumental moment in a family's life. It requires extensive team counseling and planning about complex neonatal and obstetric medical management. The construct of palliative care with its focus on…

The past decade has brought about an explosion of knowledge about the physiology of nociception and many new techniques for pain relief, new analgesic drugs, and new applications of old analgesic drugs. These techniques include methods of opioid…

Under increasing pressure to contain costs, hospitals are challenged to provide high-quality care to an increasingly complex group of children with life-threatening illness (LTI) that often worsen over time. Pediatric palliative care is an essential…

Pediatric palliative care (PPC) is a relatively new and quickly growing pediatric subspecialty. It is generally provided using a consultative model, and is available in most specialized pediatric hospitals. This article discusses PPC consultation…

Children with complex chronic medical conditions are at risk for significant distress during multiple points in their life. Pediatric palliative care can meaningfully assist in providing support to the child and family throughout their complex care,…

It is evident that opioids are underused in infants and children, mainly owing to the erroneous belief that long-term adverse effects may result from effective use, coupled with the difficulties infants and children have in verbalizing their feelings…

Caring for children who have a chronic life-limiting illness can be emotionally and physically challenging. Just as families may struggle with whether they are making the right decisions, care providers struggle with whether they are giving the right…

Quality end-of-life care includes the management of distressing symptoms; provisions of care, including the assessment and management of psychosocial and spiritual needs; and respite from diagnosis through death and bereavement. Meeting the…

The American Board of Pediatrics first recognized Pediatric Critical Care Medicine as a separate specialty in 1987. Since that time, the number of pediatric intensivists, pediatric intensive care units (PICUs), and PICU beds has continued to grow.…

The management of pain in children with life-limiting illnesses is complex and unfortunately not often done effectively. Pain is a multidimensional symptom that can overshadow all other experiences of both the child and family. This article focuses…

Children with life-threatening illnesses (LTIs) are hospitalized more often and spend more days in the hospital than children without LTIs. Hospitalizations may be associated with changes in health status of children with LTIs and thus alter their…

Withdrawing life-sustaining technologies requires all of the resources and concepts that the field of palliative care has to offer. By learning some fundamental principles of medical management at the time of withdrawal and by mastering a few…
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