Browse Items (55 total)

This study evaluated the potential impact of an online spiritual care educational program on pediatric nurses' attitudes toward and knowledge of spiritual care and their competence to provide spiritual care to children with cancer at the end of life.…

OBJECTIVE: To review the literature on cultural factors influencing clinical care and family management of pediatric cancer. METHODS: A literature review including 72 articles related to cultural issues in pediatric cancer was conducted. Information…

In pediatric oncology nursing, and across practice disciplines in general, clinical research serves as the cornerstone for improving patient care. Historically, advances made in the care and cure of childhood cancer have stemmed directly from…

Providing end-of-life care to children with cancer is most ideally achieved by initiating palliative care at the time of diagnosis, advocating for supportive care throughout the treatment trajectory, and implementing hospice care during the terminal…

Of the 100,000 children who die each year in the United States, close to 15,000 children could benefit from hospice/home care services. This article describes the concept of pediatric hospice care, reviews the Martinson study that was conducted in…

During the past decade, palliative care at home has become an alternative option to hospital care for terminally ill children. This study describes the experience of caring for a dying child at home from a parent's perspective. A qualitative research…

A diagnosis of childhood cancer is an unexpected life event that often precipitates a situational crisis for all family members. Required cancer treatments and other ongoing stressors for both child and family will significantly disrupt the family's…

The stress and psychological difficulties of siblings of children with cancer is well documented. Siblings must cope with a myriad of emotions, isolation from the family, and many changes in daily life. Therefore, a need exists to determine the…

Fatigue in adults with cancer has received considerable attention as a troublesome symptom that requires nursing intervention. Fatigue in children with cancer, however, has received considerably less focus. The first phase of the present study used…

In pediatric oncology nursing, and across practice disciplines in general, clinical research serves as the cornerstone for improving patient care. Historically, advances made in the care and cure of childhood cancer have stemmed directly from…

To explore siblings'needs and issues when a brother or sister dies of cancer, interviews were conducted with 10 surviving children and young adults. The siblings expressed dissatisfaction with the information they had received and said that they had…

When a child is diagnosed with a life-threatening illness, such as cancer, there is much disruption to the family. It is a struggle for parents to divide their time between the hospital, home, and other healthy siblings. Nurses strive to provide…

Constipation is prevalent in pediatric oncology patients because of treatment with vinca alkaloids and/or narcotics and lifestyle changes secondary to disease process. Sequelae of constipation include anorexia, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain,…

It is essential to examine conflict between patients and health care professionals from the patient's perspective. The purposes of this study were to 1) identify sources of conflict, 2) determine nursing interventions that alleviate conflict, and 3)…

Survival rates for childhood cancer have increased over the past 2 decades, due in large part to the increase in the intensity and complexity of the treatment modalities used. We can presume that this increase in intensity has produced increased…

Over twelve thousand children are diagnosed each year with cancer, and approximately 2200 children die each year from the disease. A percentage of these patients experiences escalating and intractable distress with symptoms that include pain,…

The potential clinical application of family management styles for working with families who have children with cancer is discussed. Case studies are used to illustrate the usefulness and clinical application of the model.

This article describes the process of translating the Family Management Style (FMS) Framework into a measure of FMS Survey. The conceptual underpinnings of the FMS Survey are briefly described as are the steps for translating the FMS major components…

Qualitative studies of families with children who have cancer or other serious illnesses have found that families often come to view their child and their lives as normal. They manage illness-related demands using family management styles that…

Family management styles (FMSs) explain some of the complexities embedded in a family with a child who has chronic illness. The FMS typologies provide descriptions of family adjustment and management of care. These 5 distinct patterns may be valuable…

The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the mother's experience of having a child diagnosed with cancer. Semistructured interview questions, focused specifically on values, provided the foundation for the study. Each of the 9…

When a child is ill with cancer, this affects the whole family for long periods. The aim of this study was to elucidate the family's lived experience when a child in the family was diagnosed with cancer. A descriptive inductive design with a…

When a child is diagnosed with a life-threatening illness, such as cancer, there is much disruption to the family. It is a struggle for parents to divide their time between the hospital, home, and other healthy siblings. Nurses strive to provide…

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